Canine-Friendly Cars for the Dog Days of Summer

Nigel, Erik Ross's Dog

Nigel the terrier loves feeling the wind in his face

We may be CarGurus, first and foremost, but that doesn’t prevent us from being proud pet owners, too. From French Bulldogs and Miniature Pinschers to Labradors and Great Danes, the dogs of CarGurus are a widely varied bunch. My own dog, Taylor, looks enough like a Labrador to keep landlords and kennels at ease, but her mix of breeds puts her solidly in the “mutt” camp. Regardless of size or breed, however, dogs are always a hit at CarGurus. Maybe that’s because dogs have such a social history with the automobile. They chase them, they hang their heads out the windows, and I don’t think I’ve ever met a dog who didn’t get a case of the wiggles every time it hears, “Want to go for a ride in the car?”

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How Many Cars Does the Average American Family Need?

2017_Acura_MDX

How many cars should a family own?

According to Experian, the average family owns two cars, while 35 percent of American households own three cars or more.

Ownership rates vary greatly across the country and are influenced more by location than income levels. In fact, households with incomes over $250,000 are just as likely to own a single vehicle as households with incomes of $25,000. No matter what your income, is it better to own one car that is an all-purpose, all-season vehicle, or two or more cars that each serve a specific purpose and are used only in certain conditions?

For many families, owning a single car can mean splurging on a luxury brand or buying brand new, while a 4-car family might prefer older used cars that can be purchased with cash.

Let’s look at a couple of scenarios. Which one is closest to your family’s preference?

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The Best New Convertibles You Can Actually Buy

2014 Audi RS5

Fun fact: Barbie’s awesome wardrobe wasn’t what made her cool. Her sweet dream house didn’t make her cool, her friend Ken didn’t make her cool, and her absurd, unattainable, and potentially psychologically debilitating body proportions certainly didn’t make her cool either. What made Barbie cool was her hot pink convertible. A quick Google search indicates that Barbie has owned a wide range of convertibles in her lifetime, all of which were hot pink. Yes, she went through the regrettable VW Beetle phase, and it looks like at one point she was driving around in a Suzuki Cappuccino, but she also had one with a distinctly Aston Martin grill – if pressed, we’d guess it’s a one-off Vanquish, customized by Mattel.

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What I Miss About Cars

Jaguar E-Type

I miss cars.

I miss cars that are just cars and nothing else. I miss cars that don’t drive for us. I miss cars that don’t respond to our voices. I miss cars with dials and knobs and levers and manually adjustable heat controls.

I miss cars that aren’t just drivable iPhones.

I miss cars without touchscreens, without heated steering wheels and without cooled seats. I miss cars that go fast just for the sake of going fast. I miss cars with a certain unrefined nature, the kind of cars where the smell of gasoline and the sound of exhaust find their way into the cabin.

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Too Fat? It’s Not Your Fault, Blame Your Car!

Is it the cars that make us fat, or how we choose to use them?

Is it our cars that make us fat, or how we choose to use them?

A great injustice has been done to our beloved automobiles.

They have become a new candidate in the never-ending quest to figure out what’s to blame for the obesity problem in this country.

It seems the obvious causes are no longer worthy of blame. What about the fact that unhealthy fast food is cheaper than natural organic food? Or our propensity to watch a lot of TV while ingesting mass quantities of nachos and Hot Pockets?

No, the real culprit for our fatness is something far more sinister.

Our cars.

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5 Personality Types and the Modified Cars They Love

Modified BMW 3 Series

The car you drive tells all your fellow motorists what kind of personality you have. Whether you’re the guy who cuts people off in a new Porsche Boxster, the dude headed into the woods with the NRA-branded 1972 Ford F-100 or the girl in the ’05 Jetta on the way to a college class, your car is usually a dead giveaway of who you are.

Real car enthusiasts aren’t satisfied with a typical bone-stock car and want to customize their rides to more accurately convey the personality of the mysterious human residing behind the tinted windows and buzzing bass.

Which are the best cars to customize to suit your personality? Read on, friends.

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Women’s Choice: The Top 10 Cars Females Love

For all the talk about guys and their cars, the truth is it’s the girls who make most of the buying decisions. Women account for about half of all auto purchases, but influence up to 80 percent of all automobile transactions in the U.S.

I certainly know that’s true at my house, which is why there isn’t a BMW M3 or Jaguar XK in the garage right now.

I think it’s pretty safe to say that women tend to go for practicality in cars, while guys lean toward style and power. So now that the top 10 cars that women bought in 2011 have been announced, what can we expect to see on the list? Minivans, Miatas and Jettas? Not even close!

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Ferrari or Facebook? Teens Driving Less

Ferris Bueller and the Ferrari GT California

Would Ferris today choose the Ferrari or Facebook?

When I was a teenager, I and all the other teens I knew waited with bated breath for our 16th birthday. That’s the day our parents let us skip school, took us to the local DMV and let us drive home with a brand-new driver’s license. From that day on our lives revolved around our cars. We’d drive to school, drive to friends’ houses, drive to movies on Friday nights and drive just for the sake of getting out to drive.

We watched “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” and lived vicariously through his “sick day” and his joyride in a Ferrari GT California.

Driving wasn’t just a transportation tool for us, it defined us. It gave us freedom and our first real taste of adulthood.

Many of today’s teens aren’t experiencing that, which is too bad. But it’s also a blessing.

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