Can Mazda Become the Next Volkswagen?

2016_mazda_cx-9

Volkswagen has left a gaping hole in the U.S. auto market.

The German automaker’s line of affordable turbodiesel vehicles is mostly non-existent as the fallout from last year’s emission scandal continues to unfold.

Volkswagen’s small and midsize vehicles are no longer certified for sale in the United States, and the company has, thus far, made no effort to attempt recertification. That means buyers will be hard-pressed to find a VW with a diesel engine on dealer lots across the country.

That’s in stark contrast to earlier in 2015, when Volkswagen diesels accounted for about 20 percent of the company’s sales.

Volkswagen proved that a demand for diesel exists in this country and has left an opportunity for another automaker to take the reins and attempt to satisfy whatever hunger might be left for fuel-efficient diesels.

Mazda appears ready to try its hand at becoming that automaker.

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LA Auto Show Delivers Fuel Efficiency and Raw Power

2014 Jaguar XFR-S

One in 10 new cars sold in the United States is registered in California.

That’s quite the statistic and justifies the importance of the Los Angeles Auto Show to automakers. With the unveilings officially under way in Southern California, it’s time to take a look at the most exciting, potentially game-changing vehicles that have debuted so far.

The show this year is an interesting representation of the different directions the car industry is getting pushed. Cars powered by gasoline, electricity and diesel are represented, along with plenty of raw performance cars that somehow manage to take decent fuel economy into account while shredding tires and blistering the pavement.

Read on for more.

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Going Diesel? Now Is the Best Time to Save on a Used Car

Chevrolet Cruze

Ready for a diesel Cruze?

With all the attention hybrid cars get, compared with diesels, I’m surprised to read that they share a fairly minuscule segment of the auto market. Hybrids have about a 2 percent share of the market, while diesels, remarkably, have less than 3.

I’ve made my case for diesels here many times. I prefer them because they are more durable, produce more torque and deliver up to 30 percent better fuel efficiency than their gasoline counterparts. If gas prices rise, and diesel doesn’t rise as much, the extra cost for diesel-powered cars will be worth it. The benefits over hybrids are their long-term durability and no worries about battery replacement.

Diesel cars are gaining in popularity, more new models are entering the market, and used models could be priced as low as they’re going to get for a while.

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