Despite Dangers, Speed Limits Keep Rising

Are you willing to risk safety to save 6.5 minutes of travel time?

Speed limits on highways across this great country range between 55 and 85 miles per hour depending on the size, location, and congestion of the highway. Lower limits are typically reserved for winding two-lane country highways while the 80-mph jaunts are reserved for four-lane rural Interstates.

While the nationwide 55-mph limit is long gone, some states still hang onto the lower limits in the name of safety and efficiency. Others, such as Nevada, Idaho, Texas, Montana, and more, are pushing limits up to 85 miles per hour. Continue reading >>>

The Solution for Distracted Driving: Invented in 1836?

Sometimes a modern problem is best solved by looking into the past.

Distracted driving, for instance, is a major cause of accidents, injuries, and deaths on roads around the world. Automakers have attempted to address the problem by connecting our phones to our cars so we may continue to receive the constant stream of information from our screens to our brains while driving.

That’s not working very well, though. People are still using their phones while behind the wheel to text, browse Facebook, make phone calls, and more.

Nissan has a solution that uses a piece of technology invented in 1836, and it just might work. Continue reading >>>

Self-Driving Cars Are Never Going to Happen

Lucid Air

After seeing the Lucid Air—Tesla’s most formidable competition to date—at the 2017 New York International Auto Show, it’s clear that electrification is the future of transportation. Not only do electric cars deliver exceptionally low running costs and valuable peace of mind to more environmentally conscious drivers, but more and more examples are turning in performance benchmarks normally reserved for exotic hypercars. Continue reading >>>

Cadillac’s Super Cruise: Self-Driving Done Right?

Self-driving technology continues to develop faster than auto writers can report on it.

Tesla’s AutoPilot has paved the way for autonomous driving, but it may have an Achilles’ heel: Drivers tend to get lazy and forget that they need to continue keeping an eye on the road. If the system fails, which has happened at least a few times, drivers get caught off guard and unable to quickly respond.

Cadillac began working on an autonomous driving system called “Super Cruise” about five years ago and finally has it ready to debut on the upcoming CT6 sedan.

Will GM’s system show Tesla how autonomy is done? Continue reading >>>

Uber Halts Self-Driving Program, BMW Announces One

The BMW iNEXT: Coming soon!

The drive toward full autonomy in cars continues on its relentless march, but setbacks continue to plague the new technology.

Google was among the first to publicly test self-driving cars and has logged millions of mostly trouble-free miles. Tesla is also proving the technology, though not without occasional tragedy.

Automakers around the world are also going all-in on the self-driving craze. Ford has promised full autonomy by 2021, as have Tesla, Audi, and more.

BMW just announced its intent to join that list, while Uber has abruptly halted its autonomous testing after a crash in Arizona.

Will we see full autonomy in just four short years? Continue reading >>>

5 Essentials for the Perfect Spring Break Road Trip

The snow has begun to melt, the sun is sticking around longer each day, and for thousands upon thousands of college students, the next few weeks will be some of the year’s best. For many, Spring Break means precious days away from school and the opportunity to hit the road and get out of town. Every road-trip car needs plenty of space for food and snacks, a couple of pillows, and enough room to make sure the travelers on board don’t murder each other. But there are a few other essentials, without which an interstate odyssey could easily become a terrible long haul. Continue reading >>>

Dependable Drives: Ten 2014s Worth a Look

2014 Ford F-150

As anyone who’s shopped for a used car knows, cars retain value inconsistently. In this era of Big Data, armies of statisticians are gathering and analyzing all sorts of car numbers by maker, body style, price, location, model, and so on to see what we can learn. J.D. Power recently published its 2017 Vehicle Dependability Study, which rates both makers and models, and it shows that Lexus and Porsche had the fewest reported problems per 2014-model-year vehicle, followed by Toyota, Buick, Mercedes-Benz, Hyundai, and BMW.

Each year J.D. Power polls owners of 3-year-old cars to determine the number of problems they experienced during the previous 12 months, then ranks each maker and model by the number of problems experienced per 100 vehicles. Last year we built a list of Reliable Rides featuring 10 cars that performed well in studies based on model years 2010 through 2013, and this year we’re going to take a look at some new winners and returning champs as well as some cars that have made important changes since 2014. Continue reading >>>

Headlight Replacement: Not What It Used to Be

I wonder if you, dear readers, share this same frustration in car ownership.

Back in the day, when a headlight in your car went out, you just went to your local parts store, bought a replacement headlight (not just a bulb, but the whole darn headlight), unscrewed the old one, screwed in the new one, and went on with your day.

I’m sure, unless you still drive a 1994 Tercel, you’re well aware that those days are long gone.

Headlight replacement has evolved into roughly the same category of difficulty as engine replacement. Continue reading >>>