Lexus Wants to Change the Rules of the Game

Lexus NX

Some people buy cars with reckless abandon. They need a car, they go to their favorite dealer, they pick a car, they agree to buy it, they write a check, and they drive away.

These people don’t worry about the cost of the car, because they’ve decided the MSRP is reasonable, since the car will serve its intended purpose for the next couple of years or so.

I’ve known plenty of people who purchase cars this way. They buy vehicles with names like Denali, Benz, Porsche, Lexus, and more.

I am not one of those people. I’m a negotiator, and when I think I’m at the rock-bottom price, I try to go lower.

Then again, I don’t buy new luxury cars. The people who do would rather have a good experience at the dealership than spend hours trying to save a few bucks.

Lexus hopes to take advantage of that and could offer a no-haggle pricing policy. Could Lexus become the Saturn of the 21st century?

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To Haggle or Not to Haggle on Your Next Car Purchase

2009 Saturn Sky Redline Ruby Red Limited Edition

Remember Saturn?

I know how easy it is to forget things once they are out of mind, and Saturn has been out of our minds for about 5 years now. If you’ll recall, Saturn branded itself as “a new kind of car company” and famously sold new cars at a no-haggle price through standalone dealerships.

An article from 2006 at CNN Money said,

People who buy Saturns generally love the no-haggle price. In J.D. Power and Company’s annual surveys of dealership satisfaction, Saturn consistently ranks higher than any other non-luxury car brand.

So why hasn’t the no-haggle pricing structure caught on at other automakers and dealers?

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Buy a Chevy: Don’t Like It? Return Your Chevy

2012 Chevrolet Camaro ZL-1

Now with a money-back guarantee!

Just as General Motors exited bankruptcy, it rolled out a new campaign called “Let the Best Car Win.” Part of the promotion included a 60-day return policy, wherein a buyer could bring back a purchased GM vehicle for a refund if he or she became unhappy with it.

The return rate was a mere 1% or so, which showed a pretty high level of satisfaction for GM’s cars. Or at least it showed a level of satisfaction that was good enough to avoid the trouble of starting the buying process over.

Yesterday, GM announced a new take on the return policy. This time it’s wrapped into a promotion that guarantees a no-haggle price on most Chevrolet vehicles. Will it help Chevy stay ahead of surging Toyota?

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