Can Hydrogen Surpass Electricity As the Fuel of the Future?

Electric cars are quickly becoming the mainstream choice for alternative fuels. As has been well-discussed here over the last few months, cities, countries, and automakers are committing to the elimination of gas-powered cars and the adoption of electric ones.

Toyota was among the first to introduce electricity to the masses with the hybrid Prius, but now it seems to believe the fuel of the future is hydrogen.

Could electric cars be just a stop-gap on the way to a true fuel revolution? Continue reading >>>

Will Ram Change Everything, Again?

In 1994, the Dodge Ram changed everything.

Advertising for the new generation of early ’90s pickups took America by the storm, as the newest Dodge and its sleek, curvy looks captured the most macho of hearts.

People compared the front end to a semi truck, and the look transformed Ram pickups forever while elevating their perceived toughness.

While Ram trucks remain the third-best-selling truck brand in America, behind Ford and Chevy, the trucks have continually improved over the decades and have a devoted following of fans.

Now, thanks to a gust of wind and a well-timed photograph, we know how the next-generation Ram will look. Does it pay homage to the 1994 version that changed it all? Continue reading >>>

BMW May Move MINI Production to China

A British legend was born in 1959. No, we’re not referring to the great Tracey Ullman, but another icon that has become deeply rooted in British culture and is known around the world:

The MINI.

The economy car, originally produced by the British Motor Corporation, was voted the second most influential vehicle of the 20th century, just behind the Ford Model T and ahead of the Volkswagen Beetle. Production began in 1959 and continues to this day, though ownership has changed hands a number of times.

The famous British brand has been under BMW ownership since 2001, and now the German automaker plans to further dilute MINI’s English roots. Continue reading >>>

You Can Now Subscribe to Porsche, But Should You?

If you can’t afford a Porsche, you probably can’t afford Porsche’s new subscription program, either.

The idea behind Porsche Passport, which launches in Atlanta next month, is to provide subscribers with any model of Porsche they wish at any time they wish. It’s a compelling idea, but the privilege won’t come cheap.

Car subscription models are popping up in select markets around the country. One in San Francisco, for example, is offering cars for $99 per month and between 50 cents and $1 per mile. While those rates include gas, insurance, roadside assistance, and unlimited swaps, it won’t take many miles before the monthly costs exceed the price of simply buying or leasing a vehicle.

Will people pay even more for unlimited access to the Porsche fleet? Continue reading >>>

Tesla Model 3 Delays Could Lead Buyers to Other Automakers

Freezing air has descended upon my city. Those leisurely mornings of heading out to the car in shorts and a T-shirt have been replaced by scraping windshields free of frost.

I love my electric Nissan Leaf, because I can start and warm it up using an app on my phone while I stay toasty warm inside the house. My Subaru Legacy actually requires me to go outside and start the motor with a key.

This week I needed the Legacy, because my errands required more range than the Leaf could provide. That meant I had to brave the cold, trek outside, and start the Subaru so it would be warm for my family.

When I got back inside, my wife, who was getting ready in the upstairs bathroom, asked why the car was so loud.

“Because it has a gas motor,” I said.

Needless to say, we have become accustomed to driving electric.

We’ve been hoping the next electric car might be a Tesla Model 3, but with production problems pushing back availability of the car, we, like thousands of other drivers, may have to look elsewhere. Continue reading >>>

Will Gen Y Kill Classic Cars?

Values of classic cars have steadily increased over the last few decades, and proud owners of old GTOs, Mustangs, Jaguars, Porsches, and more have reaped the benefits of maintaining and restoring older cars.

Porsche owners, for example, have seen values skyrocket, particularly on their pre-1999 911s. Classic cars at auction continue to sell well and prove themselves as good financial investments over time.

As a new generation comes of age, though, we may see those classics begin to decline in value. In fact, some say it’s already happening. Continue reading >>>

Has Hyundai Built the First True 3 Series Killer?

Everyone wants a piece of the BMW 3 Series.

The legendary car has been in the U.S. since the 1970s, but reached its pinnacle in the 1990s, which has propelled the car all way into the 21st century with little competition to worry about.

Notice that I didn’t say with little competition. I said, “little competition to worry about.”

Automakers from Audi to Mercedes-Benz and Lexus to Jaguar have fielded competitors to the mighty 3, but none have outshined the Ultimate Driving Machine.

In test after test, the BMW has reigned supreme over other luxury compact sedans. Now, though, the Germans might have reason to start looking over their figurative shoulders, because there’s a Hyundai in the rear-view. Continue reading >>>

Ford Ushers in the Era of the $100,000 Pickup

Ford has a history of being a trendsetter in many ways, but the newest precedents being set by the Michigan automaker don’t bode well for buyers of economical pickups and SUVs.

We already know that the Ford Expedition can approach $80,000 when properly configured. Trucks are set to go even higher.

Sure, we’ll always be able to buy a bare-bones F-150 for a rock-bottom price. But when it’s time to buy one with 4-wheel drive, real towing capacity, and modern luxuries, be prepared to dig a little deeper into your wallet.

How high will pickup prices go? They’re about to cross the $100,000 barrier, and we don’t even know if that’ll be the ceiling. Continue reading >>>