Back to the Well: When Automakers Reuse Brand Names

Eclipse Cross

Inspiration often comes from within. For automakers, it can even come from within their own model lineups. Mitsubishi recently announced the unveiling of an all-new Mitsubishi Eclipse…crossover. That’s right, Mitsubishi isn’t resurrecting the Eclipse you knew and loved from the ‘90s, but rather attaching the brand to the Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross, a compact crossover aimed to address a market not captured by the midsize Mitsubishi Outlander. The original Eclipse was produced for 22 years—vailable in its Eclipse Spyder convertible variant for 15 of those—before being discontinued in 2012 due to a shifting focus at Mitsubishi.

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The Last of its Kind: Ferrari 812 Superfast

We try to keep things attainable on this blog. We don’t spend a lot of time in the world of supercars because so few people ever get the pleasure of driving one home.

Sometimes, though, we just can’t resist. Supercars hold a tempting lure over any car aficionado, because they are the epitome of automotive technology. They are the fastest, most powerful, best-handling, most exotic cars on the market and, quite frankly, sometimes they’re impossible to ignore.

Plus, technology from today’s supercars could very well trickle down to tomorrow’s family sedan.

That may not be the case with the Ferrari 812 Superfast, but it sure is fun to look at, and it gives us an all-new supercar to dream about.

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Automakers Want a Review of Fuel Economy Rules

Automakers aren’t interested in building cars with exceptional fuel economy.

That’s despite a 2011 announcement by the Obama administration that requires automakers to raise fuel efficiency standards to a fleet average of 54.5 miles per gallon. According to the former administration, that would save motorists $1.7 trillion in fuel costs over the life of the vehicles, while costing the auto industry about $200 billion over 13 years.

Automakers claim that the requirements are contrary to the desires of the public and want the fuel economy regulation changed.

They’re appealing to the current president to make it happen.

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Mitsubishi Will Bring Back the Eclipse… In Name Only

If you were a teenager in the 1990s, there’s a good chance you wanted to own a Mitsubishi Eclipse. More than likely, it was the Eclipse Spyder that caught your eye and teased you with thoughts of sun-soaked road trips and the admiration of all your friends.

“One day,” you thought, “I’ll own one of those cars.”

Who wouldn’t want that sleek sports car with exotic looks and an affordable price tag?

The Eclipse was one of my teenage dream cars. However, if the 1995 me jumped ahead to 2017 and read about Mitsubishi’s plans for the Eclipse, the old me would be beside himself.

“They’re doing WHAT to the Eclipse?” Continue reading >>>

What to Look For in a Winter Vehicle

2017 Subaru Outback - Photo by Matt Smith

Winter may have taken its sweet time arriving in the Northeast, but after this past weekend, our city of Boston is a certifiable wonderland. The storms came just in time, too, as CarGurus headed down to Bugsy Lawlor’s headquarters for the annual New England Motor Press Association’s Winter Vehicle Testing. Last year, we made do with dry, frozen ground to judge the 2016 Winter Car of the Year, but after a winter storm strong enough to convince Boston Mayor Marty Walsh to declare a snow emergency, we were able to enjoy fresh snow on our favorite trail.

But what exactly should you be looking for in a winter vehicle? If television commercials are to be trusted, the only winter cars worth their salt are those capable of 4-wheel drifts down the back bowls of Colorado’s highest peaks. Blasting through fresh snow, rather than traveling up the I-95 corridor, may make for more attractive marketing materials, but most folks in the market for a winter vehicle are more interested in one that can reliably take them to work during the week and to the mountains on the weekend. If you’re looking for a car primarily to handle winter roads, there are a few details worth your attention. Continue reading >>>

About 25 Percent of Cars on the Road Need Recall Repairs—Will You Buy One?

Buying a used car can be a little like playing Russian roulette these days.

Even though modern cars are as safe as automobiles have ever been, about one in four cars on the road have open recalls on them. That translates to over 63 million cars in the United States that have been recalled but never fixed.

That represents a massive 34 percent jump over the figure that was measured a year ago.

What’s going on? Continue reading >>>

Chevy Announces Price for Raptor-Like Colorado ZR2

When I first saw the press release announcing a starting price of $40,995 for a new trim of the Chevy Colorado, I thought, “Well here we go, we’ve entered the era where a $40,000 midsize truck is normal.”

Prices for the Toyota Tacoma can eclipse the $40K mark, and the addition of the Colorado just made the number all the more normal.

Except on closer inspection, there’s nothing normal about this $41,000 Colorado. In fact, you should probably go get one. Continue reading >>>

Why GM Might Not Want to Sell You a Malibu

Maybe the people at General Motors aren’t used to selling a lot Malibus.

For as long as I can remember, cars like the Malibu and Impala existed just to provide an option for the very few people who wanted a sedan but simply had to have a Chevy.

GM’s bread-and-butter vehicles have always been its full-size trucks, SUVs, and, more recently, crossovers. The profit margins on those rigs are much higher than on sedans and small cars, so the company doesn’t like to push its smaller vehicles too hard.

Some recent redesigns have turned Chevy’s cars, the Malibu and Cruze specifically, into genuinely competitive vehicles. Much to GM’s dismay, consumers are noticing. Continue reading >>>