UAW Wants You To Buy American, But What Exactly Does That Mean?

The United Auto Workers Union desperately wants you to buy vehicles built with union labor in the United States of America.

That should come as no surprise considering the union makes its money off of organized American workers.

Some say the union model is an antiquated and obsolete way of building cars, but its pro-American sentiment is one shared by the new U.S. presidential administration. Both the UAW and the president are working to bring more car manufacturing into the country, while shunning vehicles built in countries with cheaper labor costs.

In an attempt to further its cause, the UAW will begin an ad campaign encouraging U.S. residents to only purchase vehicles built in the U.S. with union labor. That means it may suggest that you take home a U.S.-built Toyota Camry instead of a Mexico-built Ford Fusion.

From where we sit, the UAW faces an uphill battle.

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Automakers Want a Review of Fuel-Economy Rules

Automakers aren’t interested in building cars with exceptional fuel economy.

That’s despite a 2011 announcement by the Obama administration that requires automakers to raise fuel-efficiency standards to a fleet average of 54.5 miles per gallon. According to the former administration, that would save motorists $1.7 trillion in fuel costs over the life of the vehicles, while costing the auto industry about $200 billion over 13 years.

Automakers claim that the requirements are contrary to the desires of the public and want the fuel-economy regulation changed.

They’re appealing to the current president to make it happen. Continue reading >>>

The Trump Effect: Will More Car Production Stay in America?

For all the controversy President-elect Trump has created, his impending presidency seems to be having at least one immediate effect: Car production is staying in the United States.

In the last few weeks, Ford has cancelled plans for a Mexican production plant, and GM has committed to invest a billion dollars in U.S. manufacturing while adding 7,000 jobs. That news comes after Trump has publicly derided the companies for moving production out of the country.

German automakers, however, have stood firm on their existing plans for production in Mexico, even in the face of Trump’s proposed 35 percent tax on foreign cars being brought into the U.S.

Is this truly a Trump effect, or just coincidence?

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Volkswagen Pleads Guilty, FCA Accused of Cheating

A short time ago, Volkswagen executives in Germany were warned about travel to the United States. Doing so could result in arrest for criminal charges stemming from the company’s massive defrauding of the U.S. government.

Perhaps Oliver Schmidt, the former head of VW’s environmental engineering office in charge of communicating with U.S. regulators, didn’t get the memo.

The FBI pounced when Schmidt was in Miami, arresting him to face criminal charges over doctored diesel engines in more than 500,000 cars, which emitted up to 40 times the limit for nitrogen oxide under U.S. pollution standards.

Volkswagen has pleaded guilty to three felony charges and now the EPA has accused another automaker of a similar cheating scheme.

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The World Wants Cars to Talk, But Can’t Agree on a Language

Image courtesy of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

Image courtesy of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)

The U.S. Department of Transportation thinks cars should learn to talk to each other before they can drive themselves. Earlier this month it issued a proposed rule announcement requiring vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication technology in all light-duty vehicles sold in the U.S. to allow the development of collision-avoidance applications that could prevent hundreds of thousands of accidents every year.

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Paris Joins Three Major Cities to Ban Diesel by 2025

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At the C40 meeting in Mexico City last week, Paris’s mayor, Anne Hidalgo, met with the mayors of Mexico City, Madrid, and Athens, where they agreed to ban diesel cars and trucks from their cities by the year 2025. Although cities like Tokyo have implemented bans in the past, seeing this mandate implemented in traditionally diesel-friendly countries may come as a surprise to automakers that have invested heavily in diesel technology.

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Donald Trump’s Presidency Won’t Impact Car-Buying Decisions for EV Shoppers

2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV

Concerns about America’s future have run rampant since the night of November 8th, 2016. Suddenly, we’ve come to see our own social-media-driven bubbles, the emergence and impact of fake news, and how easy it is to accept what we already believe while adopting blinders for anything else. Questions have arisen regarding how the American government will amend laws surrounding health care, taxation, and even the auto industry.

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The Trouble with Self-Driving Cars: It’s the Drivers, Not the Cars

Angry driver shouting in his car

Picture yourself circling a crowded Market Basket parking lot. You see one empty spot ahead, but by the looks of it, there’s another car angling toward the same space. Your choices are simple: Politely take the high road and yield the vacancy to the other driver, or press on ahead, disregarding the feelings of your fellow motorist, and grab that parking spot while you still can.

Regardless of what they’d do in reality, I imagine most readers would profess their virtue while choosing the former. But what if you didn’t have to worry about insulting another driver? What if you only had to worry about offending an unemotional, soulless computer?

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Audi Accused of Emission Software Cheat… Again

2016-audi-a4

Audi delivered more than 17,700 vehicles in October as the German automaker hit its 70th straight month of sales increases.

The fastest-selling Audis are the A4 sedan and Q7 SUV, while the smaller Q3 is building some serious momentum.

Audi is a success story in America and is one of the top luxury brands sold here, in spite of being part of Volkswagen’s now-infamous diesel emission scandal last year.

If Audi can weather one emission-related scam, can it possibly escape two unscathed? Looks like we’re about to find out.

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