Which FCA Brand Does China Want Most?

Last week we brought you news that FCA, the company born out of the Fiat/Chrysler merger, may be sold to a Chinese automaker.

That would turn the once-iconic American Chrysler brand into a wholly foreign-owned corporation while giving a Chinese automaker entry into the coveted American car market.

This is a sale that could actually happen, but it may affect only one brand, leaving the rest of the FCA stable with a questionable future. Which brand looks most appealing to the Chinese? Continue reading >>>

Fiat Chrysler Could Be Sold to a Chinese Automaker

Chinese-owned Chrysler.

Those are words you might need to get used to hearing, as the possibility of a sale of Chrysler’s parent to a Chinese automaker has become very real.

Sergio Marchionne, CEO of FCA, has made it clear he’s looking to partner with another automaker. General Motors and Ford have both denied him, and now the auto exec is taking suitors from overseas. In fact, he has reportedly received and rejected one bid from a Chinese automaker, but that has opened the door to the possibility of receiving an acceptable offer for an outright takeover. Continue reading >>>

And the Least Satisfying Car in America Is…

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One of the strongest pieces of advice my dad ever gave me is to never, ever, buy a Chrysler. I was just a child when he told me, but the advice has stuck. His dissatisfaction with Chrysler began with the new Le Baron he bought in the 1980s, which was bad enough to skew his opinion of the automaker to this day. That’s roughly 30 years of disdain from a bad experience with one car.

I say this to illustrate the importance of vehicle satisfaction to automakers. A happy customer can mean a lifetime of car purchases while an unhappy one can negatively impact generations of car buyers.

With that in mind, let’s have a look at some results from Consumer Reports‘ annual vehicle satisfaction survey.

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Samsung and FCA Partnership: Too Little Too Late?

FIAT self driving

Apple and Samsung are fierce competitors in the phone-and-tablet businesses. In the automotive world, Apple is taking the lead by not-so-secretly developing a vehicle, which presumably will be self-driving and electric.

Samsung isn’t developing such a vehicle, but could jump-start its involvement in the auto industry by making a major purchase from Fiat Chrysler Automobiles.

Magneti Marelli is a high-tech parts maker headquartered in Italy. The company has been a subsidiary of Fiat since 1967 but could now be sold to the South Korean tech company for $3 billion.

What does this mean for Samsung’s role in the growing world of autonomous cars?

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Cars and Crustaceans: Another Successful NEMPA Ragtop Ramble

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With perfect blue skies overhead and a couple cups of coffee in our stomachs, a CarGurus team made its way to the Larz Anderson Auto Museum yesterday in Brookline, Massachusetts, for this year’s Ragtop Ramble and Crustacean Crawl. The objective: mingle with automaker PR folks and New England auto journalists, check out a bunch of cool cars, capture footage, snap photos, and eat lobster.

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A New Pacifica and the Future of Chrysler

2017 Chrysler Pacifica

Once a mainstay on American highways, Chrysler is now driving toward an uncertain future. Its partnership with Daimler-Benz has been replaced by one with Fiat, and while Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) has kept its head above water (thanks to America’s obsession with pickup trucks and the unyielding power of Jeep brand loyalty), the rest of the business raises more than a few questions. What is Fiat’s true future in the U.S. market? Will Alfa Romeo and its Giulia succeed today after a reputation for unreliability sunk them in 1995? And with only a midsize sedan with a questionable future, a full-size stalwart in a shrinking segment, and the 2017 Pacifica in a crossover-crazy era, can Chrysler stay afloat?

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FCA Wants to Merge With Ford, Toyota, or Volkswagen

FCA plus VW 2

 

FCA could be in real trouble.

The company that used to be known as Chrysler, until acquired by Fiat after bankruptcy, finds itself with an unclear future.

Last year Fiat CEO Sergio Marchionne desperately tried to force a merger with General Motors. GM, of course, wanted nothing to do it and the effort fizzled out. Now FCA seems to be on the lookout again, with a list of its top three prospects for a merger that, it hopes, can help it keep relevant into the 2020s and beyond.

One of those three, though, has already responded with a big fat “No.”

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FCA: Another Recall and the Coolest Dyno on Earth

CTC cold test dyno

You’d think, at some point, we’d grow immune to recall news and just start ignoring the mass of notices that fill the headlines of news outlets everywhere.

For now, though, the recalls that dominate headlines seem to feed our hunger for negative news and cultivate a fear of our own vehicles.

Don’t get me wrong—recalls are serious, and some of them must be addressed as soon as possible to avoid danger. Others are, in my humble opinion, the result of over-anxious government agencies trying to justify their existence.

The latest recall from FCA could potentially be a must-fix, so let’s address that and then look at something seriously cool that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is doing to constantly improve its vehicles.

First, the recall:

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Chrysler Quietly Goes Away

FCA-Fiat-Chrysler-101

It died a quiet and uneventful death.

You may not know this, but Chrysler as a company no longer exists. A foreign company has overtaken the smallest of America’s Big Three automakers and erased its corporate name.

Does this mean Chrysler automobiles have disappeared with it?

No.

Car shoppers will still have a few Chrysler vehicles to choose from, but those are limited to the 200, the 300, and the Town & Country. Chrysler Group LLC, the company that succeeded the original Chrysler Corporation that was formed in 1925, is now known as FCA US.

The change was official last year, but I think it’s fitting to take a moment and say goodbye to the company that Walter P. Chrysler founded 90 years ago.

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