Here Are the Slowest Depreciating Cars

2017 Toyota Tacoma

One of the biggest arguments against buying a new car is the fact that it becomes a used car as soon as you sign on the dotted line at the dealership.

So, in essence, new car buyers pay for the right to be the first owner of a used car. That right comes at a cost, as a car generally depreciates at a rate of 15-20 percent per year for the first three years.

Buy a $35,000 car and, just a few seconds later, it’s worth significantly less than what you just paid. That’s not the case with every new model, but the vast majority experience a significant decrease in value.

What cars can you purchase to keep as much value as possible? Continue reading >>>

Ioniq Versus Prius: The Battle for MPG Superiority

2017 Hyundai Ioniq

Maybe Toyota didn’t realize it at the time, but when it first debuted the Prius it also launched an entirely new segment of vehicles. While the Prius inspired competing automakers to get into the world of hybrids, the Toyota easily outsold them all and remained king for nearly two decades.

The Prius, which debuted in the U.S. in 2001, has evolved from a basic transportation appliance into an entirely different beast. It’s filled with new technology, improved performance, and increased efficiency. The latest iteration also has something it’s never had to deal with before:

Real competition. Continue reading >>>

Lexus Tops Dependability List While Jaguar Rises and Acura Falls

If you were to buy a car based on its reliability reputation alone, what would you get?

Would you take home a Honda or Acura because of their legendary commitment to being problem-free? Would you purchase a Toyota because you know they routinely go 300,000 miles or more?

Would you avoid Jaguar and Land Rover at all costs because of their reputation for spending more time in the shop than on the road?

J.D. Power’s annual U.S. Vehicle Dependability Study, released yesterday, reinforces some of those preconceived notions while turning others on their head. Continue reading >>>

UAW Wants You To Buy American, But What Exactly Does That Mean?

The United Auto Workers Union desperately wants you to buy vehicles built with union labor in the United States of America.

That should come as no surprise considering the union makes its money off of organized American workers.

Some say the union model is an antiquated and obsolete way of building cars, but its pro-American sentiment is one shared by the new U.S. presidential administration. Both the UAW and the president are working to bring more car manufacturing into the country, while shunning vehicles built in countries with cheaper labor costs.

In an attempt to further its cause, the UAW will begin an ad campaign encouraging U.S. residents to only purchase vehicles built in the U.S. with union labor. That means it may suggest that you take home a U.S.-built Toyota Camry instead of a Mexico-built Ford Fusion.

From where we sit, the UAW faces an uphill battle.

Continue reading >>>

Re-Thinking the Oscars: 5 Films That Deserved to Win “Best Automobile”

Jurassic Park Jeep Wrangler - iStock

This Sunday, the 89th Academy Awards will honor the actors, actresses, directors, and other critical contributors to the films of the past year. The Oscars are all about rewarding the many artists responsible for the year’s best movies—whether their craft be acting, direction, costume design, music, or any other facet of filmmaking. But, unfortunately, the Academy consistently forgets one important detail:

The cars. Continue reading >>>

The Last of Its Kind: Ferrari 812 Superfast

We try to keep things attainable on this blog. We don’t spend a lot of time in the world of supercars because so few people ever get the pleasure of driving one home.

Sometimes, though, we just can’t resist. Supercars hold a tempting lure over any car aficionado, because they are the epitome of automotive technology. They are the fastest, most powerful, best-handling, most exotic cars on the market and, quite frankly, sometimes they’re impossible to ignore.

Plus, technology from today’s supercars could very well trickle down to tomorrow’s family sedan.

That may not be the case with the Ferrari 812 Superfast, but it sure is fun to look at, and it gives us an all-new supercar to dream about. Continue reading >>>

Mitsubishi Will Bring Back the Eclipse… In Name Only

If you were a teenager in the 1990s, there’s a good chance you wanted to own a Mitsubishi Eclipse. More than likely, it was the Eclipse Spyder that caught your eye and teased you with thoughts of sun-soaked road trips and the admiration of all your friends.

“One day,” you thought, “I’ll own one of those cars.”

Who wouldn’t want that sleek sports car with exotic looks and an affordable price tag?

The Eclipse was one of my teenage dream cars. However, if the 1995 me jumped ahead to 2017 and read about Mitsubishi’s plans for the Eclipse, the old me would be beside himself.

“They’re doing WHAT to the Eclipse?” Continue reading >>>

About 25 Percent of Cars on the Road Need Recall Repairs—Will You Buy One?

Buying a used car can be a little like playing Russian roulette these days.

Even though modern cars are as safe as automobiles have ever been, about one in four cars on the road have open recalls on them. That translates to over 63 million cars in the United States that have been recalled but never fixed.

That represents a massive 34 percent jump over the figure that was measured a year ago.

What’s going on? Continue reading >>>

Alfa Romeo Returns: Tom Brady Wasn’t the Only One With a Comeback This Year

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio

Whether you’re following computers with iPods or strip-sacks with touchdown passes, comebacks are never easy. Steve Jobs recognized that developing a revolutionary piece of technology could pull Apple back into people’s lives, while the New England Patriots leaned on fundamentals (and the cool, steely nerve of Thomas Edward Patrick Brady) to bring a 5th Lombardi Trophy back home to Foxborough, Massachusetts. In the world of cars, comebacks are often no less dramatic, and we may be experiencing one right now. Continue reading >>>