More on Tesla: Why Part Deux Will Work

2016 Tesla Model X

Last week, Elon Musk, the founder of Tesla, unveiled his Master Plan, Part Deux, on his website. It lays out his plans for where his futuristic company will go in the next decade.

Now there are those of you out there who are wondering about his Master Plan, Part One, which included the following goals:

Create a low-volume car, which would necessarily be expensive; Use that money to develop a medium-volume car at a lower price; Use that money to create an affordable, high-volume car; and Provide solar power.

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What the New CAFE Standards Mean for Auto Buyers

White House Infographic, fuel economy standards

There has been a lot of news this week regarding the Environmental Protection Agency and National Highway Transportation Safety Administration issuing new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. The reports seem to suggest the government has gone lax on the issue of fuel economy because most Americans don’t seem to care about it.

One analyst, however, suggests the opposite may be true. Stephanie Brinley, a senior analyst at IHS Automotive, read the entire 1217-page midterm report that discussed the standards (something probably 99 percent of journalists didn’t do, including me).

She wrote in Forbes, “The (CAFE) standard and NHTSA projected figures for the 2025 model year targets, however, have now been revealed as a projection rather than a legal requirement. The report is supportive of the progress and direction of the existing standards. The agencies believe automakers can meet the challenge, and that consumers want it.”

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Could Now Be a Good Time to Buy a Tesla?

2015 Tesla Model S

Tesla has seen a lot of time in the news during the past couple of weeks over crashes involving its Autopilot system. Low gas prices also might be hurting its business plan, and there are some growing questions about reliability. This all begs the question: is now the right time to think about buying a Tesla? The answer is a qualified “maybe,” because the decision essentially comes down to how much risk you’re willing to assume.

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New Cars *Are* Getting Safer – Don’t Believe What You Read

Ford safety technology

The news is full of gloomy stories these days when it comes to automobiles. It might even be enough to make make you think driving an automobile is becoming more dangerous.

There is, for instance, the recent fatal collision between a Tesla Model S and a semi trailer. And the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration said last year was the deadliest on the nation’s highways since 2008.

It’s enough to make you want to swathe yourself in plastic bubble wrap and never leave the house.

But new cars are getting safer, thanks to a host of new technologies. The best part is you’ll probably never have to consciously use most of them, but you’ll nevertheless be glad they’re there.

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What the Volkswagen TDI Settlement Means for Owners

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Volkswagen has agreed to pay a massive $14.7 billion fine to the U.S. government and other entities to settle allegations of cheating on emissions tests and deceiving customers about its 2.0-liter TDI engines. That’s a big number, but what does it mean for the average Volkswagen owner?

You stand to lose a lot of value on your used Volkswagen, according to extensive CarGurus research. (Settlement details have yet to be announced for the 3.0-liter diesel engines.) CarGurus’ data team analyzed a sample of the VW models impacted by the emissions scandal in order to determine what the scandal has cost owners since news of the “defeat device” first broke in September (right before a really awkward 2016 Jetta launch in New York City). The calculations were based on CarGurus’ Instant Market Value (IMV) analysis, which is run daily on millions of used-car listings.

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Credit Score Only Fair? A 7-Year Loan Could Work for You

The new Volvo XC90

An interesting trend in automotive financing could affect your ability to buy a new car. To take advantage, you’re going to need fair (but not good) credit and be willing to stretch the duration of your loan up to 7 years.

As outlined in a recent Automotive News article, auto loans lasting 84 months or more are currently finding both advocates and opponents in the automotive-financing world. Lenders opposed to the longer loans feel consumers with fair credit are buying too much car and are therefore more likely to eventually default.

Turns out, according to Equifax data quoted in the article, these 7-year loans are the least likely to end in default among consumers in the 630-to-680 credit range, which is considered “fair” credit.

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Use the Drop in Subcompact Prices to Your Advantage

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Looking for good, basic transportation? You can’t do much better than the used subcompact market, whether you’re searching for a used car or crossover.

But don’t think you’ll save only in the subcompact used-car market. Smart maneuvering could afford you savings in other segments as well….

According to the latest research from Black Book, which evaluates the used-car market by attending hundreds of used-car auctions a week, both used cars and crossovers have shown price drops far exceeding anything else in the used-car universe.

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Buyers Want Used Cars That Will Last a Decade

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There’s an interesting quirk happening in used car buying that could affect new car sales for years to come. Almost half of all buyers want the car they buy to last at least 10 years.

The survey from AutoMD.com showed the majority of buyers are thinking pre-owned, or what we mortals would call used cars, crossovers, SUVs, and pickups. Price was the most important factor, but so was making sure the car would last a decade.

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5 Things to Know About Buy Here, Pay Here Dealers

buy here pay here lot

This Connecticut Buy Here, Pay Here dealer has cornered the market on used Suzukis.

There’s nothing inherently bad about Buy Here, Pay Here dealers. They provide a service to those automotive buyers without good credit who sometimes need a used car in a hurry.

However, it’s important to keep in mind most Buy Here, Pay Here dealers (BHPH dealers) aren’t in business to establish long-term relationships. They’re trying to make the most profit they can from financing used cars.

Here are five things you need to know before purchasing a used car from a BHPH dealer.

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