Will This Lawsuit Against Ford Boost Camaro Sales?

Marketing can be a company’s best friend when done correctly, or it can incite anger and lawsuits if done incorrectly.

Ford is learning the importance of truth in marketing, as some customers are discovering that their Shelby GT350s aren’t holding up on the track quite as well as Ford promised.

Before we go any further, it’s important to remember that Ford hasn’t done anything wrong, nor is there any confirmation that the automaker purposely sold the GT350 as something it isn’t. What we do know is a group of owners have experienced serious overheating issues while on the track, and a couple of law firms have taken notice. Continue reading >>>

Bad News for Finance Company Means Good Deals on Used Cars

Following financial news is about as invigorating as watching cantaloupe ripen, which is why the vast majority of us don’t include it as a regular pastime.

Financial developments, though, can have lasting impacts on our lives and affect the ease with which we buy houses, cars, and other items that typically require financing. Trends in the automotive finance industry can also provide a glimpse into the future of car prices and help us find the perfect timing for purchasing a new or used car.

With that in mind, we have some interesting news to share from Ally Financial, formerly GMAC, that might be good news for used-car shoppers who love to take home a great deal.

The news is not so great if you’re an automaker, a dealership, or the CEO of Ally. Continue reading >>>

Chevy Bolt vs. Hyundai Ioniq: Which Has a Brighter Future?

Flexibility is a benefit enjoyed often by small companies, but rarely by large ones. Like a small boat, businesses still in early stages can maneuver quickly; they can alter business plans, tweak messaging, and otherwise pivot without having to worry about re-orienting a large workforce or undermining the public’s understanding of the brand. By contrast, large businesses operate more similarly to a container ship. Every move requires extensive planning, communication, and extreme foresight. Fine-tuning a product can take months, and changing direction entirely can take years. Continue reading >>>

Dealer Service Scores Improve—How’s Yours?

I bought my first new car in 2003 from a Honda Dealer. The car, a straight-off-the-boat 2004 Honda Pilot, still had its plastic wrapping and something like two miles on the odometer.

I loved the car, but buying it was a high-pressure affair. The Pilot was in-demand at the time and, at least according to the salesman, the SUVs were flying off the lot for about 4 grand more than MSRP. I didn’t even test-drive the specific car I ended up buying.

I managed to get mine for MSRP. Now that I’m older and more experienced, I realize that I didn’t negotiate the best deal. Not only was the sales experience a poor one, the service at the dealership was even worse. High prices and high pressure combined to make any service visit a regrettable one.

Dealership service is a different story today, and two luxury brands have earned accolades for being among the best. Continue reading >>>

GM Downsizing! Which Cars Should Go?

Sometimes downsizing is the most responsible way to rein in spending and guarantee a future of financial well-being.

Getting a smaller house, selling those extra cars, and starting to spend a little bit less every month can have lasting positive effects on your life.

Don’t worry, this hasn’t become a self-help or financial advice blog. Downsizing is just a natural part of modern life, and sometimes even the biggest companies in the auto industry have to pare down their possessions to stay viable and relevant.

General Motors is in the midst of a downsize after selling off its European unit. It might just be getting started, too, with reduced investments potentially affecting North American vehicles. Continue reading >>>

Volkswagen Says It’s “Back on Track”—Would You Agree?

A scandal the size of the one Volkswagen is coming out of would be enough to topple many automotive companies in existence today. With billions of dollars in fines, recall, and repair costs, in addition to criminal charges from the U.S. government, the company took a direct shot to the heart of its brand that left appalled customers clamoring for answers.

Volkswagen could very well have dropped to its knees and succumbed to its injuries. Being the largest automaker in the world, though, has certain perks, and surviving catastrophe is apparently one of them.

The story of VW’s emissions cheating broke in September 2015. Just three months into 2017, the company’s chairman has declared that the automaker is “back on track.”

That statement came just days after VW pleaded guilty to three felonies in a U.S. District Court. How is that “back on track,” exactly? Continue reading >>>

New or Used? The Choice Gets a Little More Clear

Every car buyer will eventually face the dilemma of buying new or used.

New-car buyers get a strong warranty, the peace of mind of knowing no one else has driven the car, and, of course, that invigorating scent that only new cars offer.

Used-car buyers save some money and know they are getting a great value on a car that’s already seen the bulk of its depreciation. Of course, there’s also the risk of hidden problems that could cost a small fortune to repair.

What’s the best way to go? There’s no right answer, but some of the latest research makes used look like a better option than ever. Continue reading >>>

GM Heads Back to Basics—Sells Opel, Vauxhall to the French

Peugeot CEO Carlos Tavares shakes hands with GM CEO, Mary Barra

Peugeot CEO, Carlos Tavares, shakes hands with GM CEO, Mary Barra

When quality standards appeared to slip for Subaru, we asked if perhaps the small but rapidly growing Japanese brand was threatening to “fly too close to the sun.” Since 2008, General Motors has continuously adjusted course to bring its business back to basics and avoid the allure of owning far-reaching—but ultimately unprofitable—brands. The latest departure from GM’s portfolio: Opel and Vauxhall (its entire European operations) have been sold to French conglomerate Groupe PSA, formerly PSA Peugeot Citroën. Continue reading >>>

Lyft Expands While Uber Reels

Put aside Chance the Rapper’s Grammy win and in-song references to the name-brand ride-hailing app, and the past 30 days haven’t been a great for Uber. This past month, the San Francisco-based tech giant suffered one publicist’s worst nightmare after another, and its competitors are taking notice. While the company nearly synonymous with ride-hailing spends more and more time improving its image, cross-town rival Lyft announced yet another expansion, setting up operations in 94 additional cities since the start of 2017. Continue reading >>>