Will President Trump Block German Car Sales?

BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and Audi are symbols of success and prestige.

Owning one is a goal more people are realizing, as BMW sold more than 2.3 million cars last year. Mercedes-Benz was just behind at about 2.2 million, while Audi unloaded some 1.8 million vehicles.

BMW builds its SUVs right here in the States, and Mercedes-Benz has a manufacturing plant in Alabama. Needless to say, German automakers contribute a fair share to the American economy, and well-off car buyers are taking home their wares in record numbers.

Yet the U.S. president is not happy and has vowed to block the “very bad” Germans from exporting cars to our country.

Never mind the fact that the president owns at least one Rolls-Royce (a company owned by BMW) and a Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren. Continue reading >>>

Your Next BMW: Built in China?

BMW 1 Series sedan: Made in China

If Chinese quality has become good enough for Buick, Volvo, and BMW, there’s a good chance it’s good enough for you.

Cars made in China have long been associated with questionable reliability, gaps in body panels, and sub-standard safety features. Those days may be behind us, however, as foreign automakers continue to invest in Chinese manufacturing.

The Buick Envision and Volvo S60 are the first made-in-China cars imported for sale in the U.S., and they are each getting mostly positive reviews from auto journalists around the country.

Now BMW seems ready to further elevate Chinese manufacturing and import models built in China for sale to customers in Germany and the United States. Continue reading >>>

Can BMW Reclaim the Title of Ultimate Driving Machine?

BMW spent years, decades even, proclaiming itself as the Ultimate Driving Machine. It wasn’t all just talk, though, because the company delivered again and again with vehicles that were the benchmark of luxury and performance. Others tried, but no one could approach BMW’s level of superiority.

Best luxury sedan, best sport sedan, best luxury SUV… all wore the BMW logo and everyone—from consumers, to reviewers, to the automakers themselves—knew it.

But something happened in the last five years or so. BMW fell asleep at the wheel and gave the rest of the industry a chance to catch up. BMW leaders are now in panic mode as they’re realizing they’ve fallen behind and must scramble to keep up with the likes of Tesla, Jaguar, Porsche, Audi, and Mercedes-Benz. Continue reading >>>

Toyota Corolla Could Gain a BMW Heart

2017-toyota-corolla

Let’s think of ways the Toyota Corolla could be made more exciting. The compact sedan is one of the most reliable and practical little cars money can buy, but it’s also one of the least exciting. The Corolla lacks performance and handles about as well as a dishwasher around corners, but people buy it because they appreciate its value and long-term reliability.

To make it more exciting, maybe Toyota could throw in a turbocharger or upgrade the exhaust system. Or maybe the company could drop in a new engine. Maybe even a BMW motor. But that would never happen, right?

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Tesla, Autopilot, and the Future of Self-Driving Cars

Tesla AutoPilot

From the first press release outlining Tesla’s Autopilot technology, potential customers have wondered how the system works, what its limitations are, and whether it will be welcomed or shunned. Since Joshua Brown’s fatal crash while using Autopilot in a Tesla Model S, these questions have grown larger and more pointed. Without a doubt, popular opinion has shifted toward negativity. But should it?

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Taking a Look at the Most and Least Expensive Cars to Own

2016 BMW 340i

There are some things we replace, and other things we repair. I have no qualms replacing a toothbrush every couple months, or buying a new pair of running shoes after a few hundred miles. When it comes to more expensive items, however, my point of view shifts dramatically. Companies like Patagonia have made a strong push against disposable merchandise, offering repair services for their products and encouraging shoppers to fix their gear rather than just throwing it away and buying replacements. It’s a commendable, environmentally friendly decision—and considering the price tags on Patagonia products, one that’s appreciated by shoppers, too.

Of course, when it comes to repairing vs. replacing, nothing trumps the auto industry. Drivers spend hundreds, sometimes thousands of dollars per year keeping their cars on the road and, try as a I might, I just can’t visualize disposable cars showing up anytime soon. YourMechanic.com connects car owners with mechanics and in doing so has amassed an impressive data set breaking down the average cost of ownership by brand and specific model, including the maladies that most commonly afflict each brand.

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Mercedes-Benz and Audi Just Outsold BMW

2015-mercedes-benz-cla-class

BMW has been the benchmark of luxury car sales in the United States for decades. The BMW 3 Series, 5 Series, X3, and X5 have provided the German automaker with ample opportunity to dominate sales charts here.

Worldwide, though, the other two German companies have been slowly inching closer to the sales king by offering what many consider to be better-designed cars that provide superior value. Mercedes-Benz and Audi are top-tier luxury players and last month both managed to outsell their cross-country rival.

Does this mean we have a new champ in the luxury and performance category? Not yet. But BMW ought to quickly come up with a plan to keep itself on top.

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BMW Moves Closer to Front-Wheel Drive

BMW 2 Series

I have to wonder if BMW is still the “Ultimate Driving Machine.” The company dropped its legendary tagline in 2006, brought it back in 2012, and uses it sparingly today.

Maybe the company knows it’s becoming just “another driving machine.”

BMW has always been known as a performance-oriented luxury brand with the perfect balance between handling and power. The automaker has traditionally used a rear-wheel-drive setup on all of its vehicles, save for its full-time all-wheel-drive models.

Rear-wheel drive just makes sense given BMWs’ large engines, long hoods, and short rear decks. Power going to the rear wheels enhances every aspect of the driving experience.

But what happens when the engines get smaller and the cars shrink? Rear-wheel drive stops making sense. Welcome to the new generation of BMW.

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Which Cars Still Look Great After Decades on the Road?

1985 ferrari testarossa-pic-40441

The Ferrari Testarossa: Still a good-looking car!

If your family is anything like mine, going on a road trip generates plenty of interesting conversation. In many families, those conversations often end with intense bickering, due to heated opinions.

I’m lucky because our conversations tend to revolve around cars, but that doesn’t mean they’re not heated.

When the topic of cars that still look great after a couple decades came up, there were two distinct opinions .

The conversation began when a late model Ferrari California drove by while we shopped in the city of Carmel-by-the-Sea, Calif.

Our daughter thought the Ferrari was a Porsche and pointed it out first. Thus began the Great Debate of 2015.

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The Two Tiers of Luxury: Which Do You Prefer?

"Tier 2" does not mean "inferior."

“Tier 2” does not mean “inferior.”

Is a Lincoln as good as a Lexus?

Can an Acura take down an Audi?

Will an Infiniti be as good as a BMW?

There are two groups of cars in the luxury world: the ones that command respect and the ones that desperately want it. Automotive News breaks these down a little more formally, calling them the “Tier 1” group and the “Tier 2” group.

Tier 1 includes BMW, Lexus, and Mercedes-Benz. Tier 2 includes Lincoln, Acura, Cadillac, and Audi.

If I were making the rules, I’d put Audi up in Tier 1, because it has decidedly outsold the others in Tier 2 and has, in my humble opinion, eclipsed the quality level of BMW.

The Tier 1 group continues to establish its dominance, while the Tier 2 group struggles to maintain relevance. Are cars from Tier 2 worth considering?

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