BMW and Chevrolet Double Down on Electric SUVs

BMW X7 iPerformance Concept

BMW and Chevrolet are changing the world of transportation, but not in the way we might have thought they would.

Both companies are driving us toward an electric future, and both have just taken epic steps to help solidify their choice of EVs as the cars of the very near future.

More specifically, both have selected SUVs and crossovers as the electric cars of the future. Continue reading >>>

Should You Be Worried About Replacing a Used EV’s Batteries?

2017 Chevy Bolt

One of the benefits of owning an electric car is not needing to buy gasoline. The cost savings add up year after year, even when you include the cost of electrons to recharge the batteries.

Two of the biggest concerns since the advent of hybrid and EV technology are electric range and potential cost of replacing battery packs.

Range anxiety has mostly been solved as EV range steadily increases to over 200 miles per charge. Replacing battery packs has, so far, proven to be a non-issue, but it’s bound to become one as the earliest EVs continue to age. How much should people expect to pay once the inevitable happens?

About half of what the car cost new, at least according to Chevrolet. Continue reading >>>

Electric Cars: Thriving in an Artificial Market?

2017 Chevrolet Bolt

Are electric cars being force-fed to an unwilling American public? Through the first 11 months of 2016, Americans have purchased about 130,000 electric vehicles. That sounds pretty impressive, until you compare that to the nearly 16 million cars sold in the U.S. so far this year.

While it feels like electric cars are gaining traction here, the truth is that they account for only a tiny fraction of total sales and hold a minuscule portion of market share.

So why are automakers continually announcing plans for new electric cars and touting them as the future of American transportation?

Because California says so.

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Chevy Bolt Should Eliminate Range Anxiety


Range anxiety is about to become a quaint memory from the early days of electric cars.

When EV technology was getting started, just a few short years ago, we were lucky to get 40 miles of range on batteries alone.

The original Chevy Volt couldn’t manage much more than a short daily commute and needed a gas-powered motor in addition to the electric one to give buyers some extra peace of mind.

The first all-electric Nissan Leaf fared much better, with an 84-mile range, but still left motorists stranded after pushing the limits too far. Today’s Leaf can top 107 miles of electric range while the much more expensive Tesla Model S can go more than 250 miles.

Chevrolet is about to change the game and combine Tesla-like range with Nissan-like affordability.

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Cadillac ELR Gets the Ax, Chevy Bolt Prepares for Domination


Automakers, please note: The future of electric cars doesn’t include $76,000 luxury vehicles that look fast but go slow.

That seems like common sense, right?

A Cadillac that looks like the one pictured here should wrap its occupants in opulence while also delivering tooth-rattling performance.

This is the Cadillac ELR, though, a vehicle that brought everything to the table except performance. Like the 2005 Ford Thunderbird, this Caddy has failed to find a long-term home because it didn’t deliver on the promises made by its seductive design.

Production of the ELR has come to an abrupt end after just two years on the market.

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Ford to Compete With Tesla, Chevy, for Long-Range EV Customers


Chevrolet will very likely be the first to get a 200-mile $30,000 electric car to market. The company’s Bolt will go into production this fall, followed a year (or so) later by the Tesla Model 3.

Ford has, thus far, shown no interest in a long-range EV, even saying earlier this month that a 100-mile range is plenty. Ford has increased the range of the 2017 Focus Electric from 76 miles to 100, and has said that’s as far as the company plans to go due to the increased costs of larger battery packs. Ford’s electrification guru, Kevin Layden, said,

I think right now with the launch of the Focus Electric at 100 miles, it is going to satisfy a big chunk of the population. It’s going to be really affordable and a step up from where we are now.

Ford CEO Mark Fields seems to have other plans.

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Day Two at the Javits Center: The New York International Auto Show

Honda Civic Hatchback Concept

Day Two began with the World Car Awards. Backed by a surprisingly loud, club-ish soundtrack and some odd song choices (maybe intended to help attendees wake up after a very long Day One?), the Toyota Mirai fuel-cell vehicle got the World Green Car Award, the Audi R8 Coupe took the World Performance Car Award, and the BMW 7 Series won the World Luxury Car Award. Mazda managed to take two trophies, as 2016 World Car Design of the Year and World Car of the Year, with its MX-5 Miata, and having driven the car ourselves, we heartily applaud the WCA jurors’ decision.

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Tesla Model 3 or Chevy Bolt? No Contest!

Tesla Model 3

Soon a $37,000, 200-mile electric vehicle will arrive on the market. The car could be the one that finally ushers in the era of the affordable, high-range, mass-produced electric car.

This car is well along in its development and will be available to purchase in the coming year.

The car’s designers made aerodynamics a top priority, so it slips effortlessly through the air. When in motion, wind flows around the vehicle from the headlamps to the rear wheels. The aluminum body and smooth proportions cut down on weight and drag to increase both range and acceleration. Plus, the bottom of the car is completely flat, since there aren’t any exhaust bits that need to be kept cool.

Yes, this car could be a game changer.

Oh, and Tesla is building one, too.

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No Joke: Get Ready for the Chevy Bolt

The Chevy Volt

The Chevy Volt

How could it be true? Why would Chevrolet, which currently builds the electric/gas hybrid Volt, introduce a new electric car and call it the Bolt?

It seems that one of the top automakers in the world will resort to rhyming names of cars that are in the same class.

Some automakers employ nomenclature that use alliteration to label a certain class of vehicle, such as Ford and its SUVs that begin with E (Explorer, Escape, and Expedition) and its cars that begin with F (Fusion, Focus, and Fiesta).

That’s a strategy that makes sense. Using rhymes, as Chevy is now learning, will lead to nothing more than mockery.

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