Here Are the Slowest Depreciating Cars

2017 Toyota Tacoma

One of the biggest arguments against buying a new car is the fact that it becomes a used car as soon as you sign on the dotted line at the dealership.

So, in essence, new car buyers pay for the right to be the first owner of a used car. That right comes at a cost, as a car generally depreciates at a rate of 15-20 percent per year for the first three years.

Buy a $35,000 car and, just a few seconds later, it’s worth significantly less than what you just paid. That’s not the case with every new model, but the vast majority experience a significant decrease in value.

What cars can you purchase to keep as much value as possible? Continue reading >>>

Dependable Drives: Ten 2014s Worth a Look

2014 Ford F-150

As anyone who’s shopped for a used car knows, cars retain value inconsistently. In this era of Big Data, armies of statisticians are gathering and analyzing all sorts of car numbers by maker, body style, price, location, model, and so on to see what we can learn. J.D. Power recently published its 2017 Vehicle Dependability Study, which rates both makers and models, and it shows that Lexus and Porsche had the fewest reported problems per 2014-model-year vehicle, followed by Toyota, Buick, Mercedes-Benz, Hyundai, and BMW.

Each year J.D. Power polls owners of 3-year-old cars to determine the number of problems they experienced during the previous 12 months, then ranks each maker and model by the number of problems experienced per 100 vehicles. Last year we built a list of Reliable Rides featuring 10 cars that performed well in studies based on model years 2010 through 2013, and this year we’re going to take a look at some new winners and returning champs as well as some cars that have made important changes since 2014. Continue reading >>>

Ioniq Versus Prius: The Battle for MPG Superiority

2017 Hyundai Ioniq

Maybe Toyota didn’t realize it at the time, but when it first debuted the Prius it also launched an entirely new segment of vehicles. While the Prius inspired competing automakers to get into the world of hybrids, the Toyota easily outsold them all and remained king for nearly two decades.

The Prius, which debuted in the U.S. in 2001, has evolved from a basic transportation appliance into an entirely different beast. It’s filled with new technology, improved performance, and increased efficiency. The latest iteration also has something it’s never had to deal with before:

Real competition. Continue reading >>>

Lexus Tops Dependability List While Jaguar Rises and Acura Falls

If you were to buy a car based on its reliability reputation alone, what would you get?

Would you take home a Honda or Acura because of their legendary commitment to being problem-free? Would you purchase a Toyota because you know they routinely go 300,000 miles or more?

Would you avoid Jaguar and Land Rover at all costs because of their reputation for spending more time in the shop than on the road?

J.D. Power’s annual U.S. Vehicle Dependability Study, released yesterday, reinforces some of those preconceived notions while turning others on their head. Continue reading >>>

UAW Wants You To Buy American, But What Exactly Does That Mean?

The United Auto Workers Union desperately wants you to buy vehicles built with union labor in the United States of America.

That should come as no surprise considering the union makes its money off of organized American workers.

Some say the union model is an antiquated and obsolete way of building cars, but its pro-American sentiment is one shared by the new U.S. presidential administration. Both the UAW and the president are working to bring more car manufacturing into the country, while shunning vehicles built in countries with cheaper labor costs.

In an attempt to further its cause, the UAW will begin an ad campaign encouraging U.S. residents to only purchase vehicles built in the U.S. with union labor. That means it may suggest that you take home a U.S.-built Toyota Camry instead of a Mexico-built Ford Fusion.

From where we sit, the UAW faces an uphill battle. Continue reading >>>

Automakers Want a Review of Fuel-Economy Rules

Automakers aren’t interested in building cars with exceptional fuel economy.

That’s despite a 2011 announcement by the Obama administration that requires automakers to raise fuel-efficiency standards to a fleet average of 54.5 miles per gallon. According to the former administration, that would save motorists $1.7 trillion in fuel costs over the life of the vehicles, while costing the auto industry about $200 billion over 13 years.

Automakers claim that the requirements are contrary to the desires of the public and want the fuel-economy regulation changed.

They’re appealing to the current president to make it happen. Continue reading >>>

What to Look For in a Winter Vehicle

2017 Subaru Outback - Photo by Matt Smith

Winter may have taken its sweet time arriving in the Northeast, but after this past weekend, our city of Boston is a certifiable wonderland. The storms came just in time, too, as CarGurus headed down to Bugsy Lawlor’s headquarters for the annual New England Motor Press Association’s Winter Vehicle Testing. Last year, we made do with dry, frozen ground to judge the 2016 Winter Car of the Year, but after a winter storm strong enough to convince Boston Mayor Marty Walsh to declare a snow emergency, we were able to enjoy fresh snow on our favorite trail.

But what exactly should you be looking for in a winter vehicle? If television commercials are to be trusted, the only winter cars worth their salt are those capable of 4-wheel drifts down the back bowls of Colorado’s highest peaks. Blasting through fresh snow, rather than traveling up the I-95 corridor, may make for more attractive marketing materials, but most folks in the market for a winter vehicle are more interested in one that can reliably take them to work during the week and to the mountains on the weekend. If you’re looking for a car primarily to handle winter roads, there are a few details worth your attention. Continue reading >>>

About 25 Percent of Cars on the Road Need Recall Repairs—Will You Buy One?

Buying a used car can be a little like playing Russian roulette these days.

Even though modern cars are as safe as automobiles have ever been, about one in four cars on the road have open recalls on them. That translates to over 63 million cars in the United States that have been recalled but never fixed.

That represents a massive 34 percent jump over the figure that was measured a year ago.

What’s going on? Continue reading >>>

Chevy Announces Price for Raptor-Like Colorado ZR2

When I first saw the press release announcing a starting price of $40,995 for a new trim of the Chevy Colorado, I thought, “Well here we go, we’ve entered the era where a $40,000 midsize truck is normal.”

Prices for the Toyota Tacoma can eclipse the $40K mark, and the addition of the Colorado just made the number all the more normal.

Except on closer inspection, there’s nothing normal about this $41,000 Colorado. In fact, you should probably go get one. Continue reading >>>