Can a Hyundai Be Better Than a BMW?

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There’s something seductive about the idea of buying a used luxury car.

Getting a car that will make friends and family swoon is exciting, so why not cruise around in the kind of style only a used Jaguar or BMW can offer?

Stepping a few model years into the past can get you a car that costs less than an entry-level new car. Plus, used luxury cars usually have better driving dynamics and possess way more brand panache than your average new Hyundai.

However, buying older luxury can cost you more than you might realize, and not just in maintenance costs.

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The Jaguar XE’s Biggest Competition: A Used BMW?

2015 Jaguar XE

With great fanfare and media attention, Jaguar has released official images, specs and pricing of its new XE. This is a huge deal, because the XE is a car set to compete against the BMW 3 Series and Audi A4.

There’s one caveat to the above statement, though: So far specs and pricing are specific to the European market.

The info is enough to infer that the new “baby Jag” will be nothing like its predecessor, the X-Type. It’ll be lighter, faster, more fuel efficient and, to some people, better looking.

That, however, is debatable, and I wonder if the price of entry will send shoppers right back into the arms of the Germans.

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BMW 1 Series: A Great Used Buy?

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Lexus has said it could never build a car priced under $30,000, because it wouldn’t be a Lexus, it would be a Toyota.

That’s a respectable position to take, because it gives the luxury brand at least a little separation from its plebeian cousin.

Other luxury automakers have decided against that strategy and built entry-level vehicles designed to entice younger buyers into their brands. That decision, though, cheapens the brand for more upscale buyers.

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The Greatest BMW Ever?

bmw 8 series

BMW created its masterpiece 25 years ago.

The flagship grand tourer topped the BMW product line and could be considered as much a supercar as a family car.

The legend of the BMW 8 Series lasted about a decade, with more than 30,000 copies built between 1988 and 1999. With a starting price of $70,000 and an available V12 sending power to the rear wheels through a 6-speed manual transmission, the car introduced features previously unseen on production cars.

The 8 Series died an untimely death, partly because new emissions standards were too cost prohibitive to meet without extensive re-engineering.

A new 8 Series may or may not ever hit the market, but what are the odds of snagging an old one?

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